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Intels 13900k 24 Core 32 Thread BEAST Shows Its Face!!!



Intels 13900k 24 core 32 thread beast shows its face!!!
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  1. Still using haswell and with and 150ti and ssd upgrade getting near time for the next upgrade.

  2. "PCs used to be really expensive back in the day" "PCs have gotten more expensive today than they were back in the day" — I'd say the real truth about this is that the PC Landscape has significantly grown and expanded since, say, the early 2000s for example. The gap between the lowest end and the highest end has gotten a lot bigger today than it was back then. Cheapest desktop you could get back then was maybe 1000 dollars, cheapest you can get today is like 250 now. They say the most expensive desktop was 5000 back then, the most expensive desktop you could get oh 10,000, 50,000, we've seen the Mac Pro as well as those crazy monstrous liquid cooled HEDT/server CPU based multi-GPU custom built workstations. Because of cheaper and better manufacturing, low-end computers are able to be made at prices one could only dream of back then, and super high end things like HEDT and server stuff are able to be economically made now. Let's not forget to mention most importantly performance and capability which is where this bigger price range comes from. The gap between the lowest end and the highest end computer in 2008? Maybe around 10x. The gap between lowest end and highest end today? Something like 200x. Of course this is not a real calculation, more of a wild guess, but you sorta get the idea here.

    By the way the same thing applies to laptops, the laptop market has grown huge as well, and diversified with laptops being purpose made for different use cases like design/productivity stuff on the go (workstation laptops), gaming, and such. I don't think there were 'gaming' or workstation laptops in the 90s, at least not that many.

    Consumers are simply offered so much more choice in the computer market today than they were back in the day.

    Nothing wrong with technological progression. Yes, 4 core 8 thread CPU may be the bare minimum for most AAA and AAA-like games right now, but that'll eventually change, just like how 4C4T was previously the baseline and before that, 2C4T, 2C2T etc. Game devs eventually have to move on and stop compromising their game's physics, AI, and whatnot to be able to run on ancient hardware from 6+ years ago, as more and more people adopt CPUs with higher core counts. The idea is not to target as absolutely close to 100% of the players out there as possible but target a good portion of the players, say 82%, whatever percentage creates a good balance of profits and the level of quality / fidelity that the devs want in the game.

    I think the problem you mentioned in the video regarding how some people refuse to go to a higher core count CPU at all, is that many people tend to resist technological change. We see it all the time, the people who doubt and hate on EVs, hybrid cars, SSDs, clean energy, heck even energy efficient light bulbs. Yes, change can be a bit difficult to adapt to, but once you fully adapt and get the experience of it, only then you'll realise how much of a great leap it really is. It took me a great amount of courage to upgrade from my 10+ year old yet perfectly functional HP workstation, to this current desktop I have which had mid-range hardware mostly from 2017-2018 when I got it. (Did a few upgrades since, but baseline capability mostly the same.) I loved the way the HP looked, the design of it, some of the unique functions it could do, yada yada. Yet here I am, so glad to make this massive leap in not only performance (2-3x the HP), but also system capabilities, such as USB 3.0, USB 3.2 Gen 2, SATA III, PCI-E 3.0, M.2 NVMe, 802.11ac Wi-Fi, all this sweet stuff which the HP workstation did not have any of. Absolutely no regrets despite the "hard to let go of" / "sad to see it gone" feelings I had in the beginning.

    A small concern I have regarding CPU core count, is that if software developers will be able to keep up the pace with rapidly increasing core counts to continue to make full use of it at all. Yes, video rendering and software compiling I know that stuff is easy to multithread, but what about video games and many productivity desktop applications that aren't easy to multithread? There are still (some) games and applications being made right now that only support 2 threads, 4 threads, 6 threads etc. Shame on you Microsoft Flight Simulator (a first-party game released in 2020) with your DX11 graphics engine and single threaded renderer. Single core performance and IPC are still very important. I know you didn't say in the video that they aren't, I know CPU companies will still continue to innovate in those areas, this is just an interesting food for thought I had as you were talking about core counts.

  3. i remember pentium vs pentium pro and while most pentium pros had 256k cache some more expensive skus had one whole megabyte on die, those were sort of pre Xeons

  4. Where I disagree is this assumption- Notion, New is automatically superior without question. Where an idea born yesterday because of Hype trumps 2000 years of understanding, evidence

    Three cylinder engines are now considered superior, by most people because on the surface they now can give similar performance with better mpg. Therefore ignore the complexity, When for over half a century its been understood that it’s past the point of diminishing Quality.
    But now that advanced electronics is next to nothing, and they can to stop the engine vibrating itself to pieces, because it’s another contradiction in function, Manufacturers can give you Less, and rely on the lowest common denominator of stupidity to spread the Hype and PR BS

    There’s loads of examples including Streaming, Now instead of continuing with physical media, non proprietary competition to Blu-Ray, bringing down pricing. You have 1/10th of the Quality, Nice plastic skin. All falsely advertised as HD on superficial measurement of resolution, Goodbye 80-120mb 4K hello 8-15mb 4K. And for Far less Quality you Pay more and never own any media. Yep that’s progress

    My point is thats happening with Intel and e-cores, Instead of spending ten-hundreds of millions on developing an architecture that actually makes 16 or 24 cores viable, They’ve discovered an underhanded trick and sold us a Lie, Like Nividia. It’s all tactics, smoke and mirrors. The 3 cylinder engine That on the Surface Looks Superior. Like the initial Convenience of streaming

    Its whether the future Cost In the devolution In methodology, Was worth the small initial savings in pricing!

  5. theres no game that can take advantage of cores in the cpu like ashes can thats why they are leaked there , its not because its a terrible benchmark.

  6. I kind of disagree, in principle your correct however, practically I think your wrong. I’m running a 3900X and at 3440×1440 iim not even using 40% of its utilisation. So I think we don’t actually need more cores, what we do need is a higher IPC and faster and more efficient cores. There comes a point where more cores do become pointless and Ymir paying for massive diminished returns in your investment.
    It’s like building a company and having 20 people working really well for you, then in a year you employ 40 people but 20 of them have nothing to do but your still paying them to do nothing.

  7. I feel bad about the guys who purchased a threadripper 3960x for over 1600$ US now and see intel raptor lake getting launched just quarter later at a price of around 700$ easily beating the 3960x in almost every performance and power consumption matric.

  8. Stupid question but what are the performance from the E core when it comes to virtualization (virtual machine)?

  9. My biggest concern is Intel appears to be back with their dishonest anti-trust methods. For instance, selling all their desktop cpu's at near cost to manufacture. That way AMD must do the same to remain competitive and they cannot afford to play this game for very long whereas Intel will live on their surplus billions it has in its coffers. This is what I see unfolding today. Great, you may say, competition is good for the consumer. Well, I'm not so sure about that. What I am annoyed with you Chris is the expectation that the cost of producing chips has remained the same over the past 10 years or even gone down. The Intel 7700K, a 4 core, retailed for $349 5 years ago and now there is the expectation that an 8 core somehow costs the same or less. The cost to produce chips has doubled since 2017. When one takes into account the much higher wages, R&D, substrate, TSMC, assembly and advertising costs, it's obvious. Intel is being arseholes once again.

  10. Paul, the Intel lineup starts at 12600k for most of us. Show me a quad core intel intends for you to OC. The price doesn't come down – intel just increases the core count.

  11. I like your point about why more cores are needed. While I don't need more cores for my current workloads (more cores won't improve performance in my applications), I'm always looking for faster and/or cheaper versions of what I do need. Problem is they put the highest clock speeds along with the most cores. If you want the fastest single core you have to get all the extra cores that you don't need. This is why I say I care more about clockspeed and IPC. My applications can't use more cores but they can use more clock speed and IPC.

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